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Baby Acne: What Causes It And How Long Does It Take?


When it comes to acne, it is certainly not the baby that comes to our minds, though it is surprisingly common for them to develop small skin defects. What is the cause of acne and what can we do about it?

Babies are supposed to have perfect, fluffy, velvety skins - and that's usually true. However, this flawless skin often does not develop immediately, as babies may have about 20 percent acne in the first six weeks after birth. It's even rarer for you. infantile acne, which may be typical of a 3-6 month old baby. Toddler acne develops more frequently in boys. It usually goes away by half.Not all babies have flawless and perfect skin We still can't tell exactly what causes acne, but they believe that testosterone levels and sebaceous glands are correlated with it. small, reddish, white medium leather they occur mainly in the nose, cheeks or foreheads, but can also be found on the shoulder, scalp, neck, chest and even on the back. Infantile acne may be more severe, acne may be larger, more painful, and cysts may develop.It is important to be aware that certain skin diseases (eg, . One of the biggest differences is that in other illnesses, the whole body can be affected, whereas acne rarely affects the lower parts of the body, such as the flank or the leg. Of course, if any baby is suspected of having a disease, or if there is any other condition besides the skin, for example, increased numbness or fever, consult a pediatrician immediately. they don't need any handlers, a few weeks later they think of themselves. According to experts, it is strictly forbidden to press, dirty acne, or to lubricate them with alcohol or other acne medication. Be very careful with your tiny skin, do not use dry or excessively greasy products. For the treatment of more severe infantile acne, ask for a skin care tip: it may be self-explanatory, but you may also need to use special cosmetics, ointments. (Via)Also worth reading:
  • Baby Care Tips: Cosmic, Diaper, Warm
  • Frequent skin diseases in children 0-3 years
  • Newborn skin changes